Security&Privacy

  • Relax dear-citizen your contactless card is relatively safe—ish As Malaysia slowly (but surely) migrates to Chip and Pin, some banks have taken the opportunity to issue not just new Pin-enabled cards, but contactless-enabled ones as well. To be clear, Banks are only mandated to issue new Pin cards (replacing the signature cards you had before), but are taking the opportunity to also embed contactless capabilities into them ...
  • Securing your StarHub Home Router As with all new shiny equipment,  a newly installed router in your home requires a few things to be configured to properly secure it. Goes without saying, that you should change your WiFi password the moment the technician leaves your home, but there are other things you’d need to configure in order to secure your router ...
  • Preventing a DDOS is not going to be easy As a follow-up to my previous post on DDOS attacks , I’ve seen a lot of so-called ‘solutions’ to the problem, which really aren’t solutions at all. While it’s still not explicitly clear that the StarHub DDOS was executed by Mirai, a recently released malware built specifically for DDOS, the timing and similarity of it to ...
  • Internet of shitty things! Brian Krebs is the most reputable name in CyberSecurity reporting, his krebsonsecurity website is the best source of ‘real’ journalism on the subject. But reputation works both ways, the same thing that makes him popular in some circles, makes him unpopular in other. He’s had criminal hackers send him heroin in the mail and even have SWAT teams ...
  • The safest place for your money is under the mattress When I was in school, we joked about people who kept their money under the mattress, that somehow those who didn’t use banks were less intelligent than people who did.The general thinking was that smart people kept their money in the bank, where it was safe from theft, fire and flood, while still collecting interest. In the 80’s this ...
  • Michael Hayden on interesting points Some interesting points: Non-nation state actors now pose a significant threat to nation states Historical threats usually associated with bad nation states, can now be executed by non nation-states Industrial Era, was about a consolidation of power, in the past only the Government could run something as complex as a phone network In a Post-Industrial Era, it’s about the ...
  • Anonymity and IP addresses This week, I’ll put the final touches on my move from Malaysia to Singapore. So, I felt it would a good idea to read through some Singaporean tech articles to see how tech events played out on the little red dot, and offer some unsolicited  and completely useless advice on them. It wasn’t easy shifting through a boat-load ...
  • Two years on, teaching coding in schools declared a success KLANG: Two years on, the the pilot initiative to teach coding and digital security as an SPM subject has been touted as a resounding success, and the government is mulling a move to make it compulsory by 2020. The announcement shocked parents, as out of 10,000 students who took part in the pilot program, only 10 ...
  • More security theatre So now, only actual travellers will be allowed into airports, and everybody else from your mother to your 3rd aunty twice removed has to say their teary goodbye at home rather than at the Airport KFC. But why? So that terrorist will now have to buy a ticket in order to blow up the airport? I can picture ...
  • Show notes for today Your browser does not support native audio, but you can download this MP3 to listen on your device.   Some interesting links you might want to check out during my interview on BFM today, will tidy up this list later in the week. Office of Personnel Management Data Breach (Chinese hackers breaking into US Federal Employee Databases) China arrested ...
  • This is how Pedophiles get caught This will easily be the most controversial blog post I ever wrote, so consider yourself warned. It’s controversial, because it touches on multiple taboos in our society, sex, child abuse and security theater. You see, there’s been a growing call for a national sex offender registry, especially in the wake of news that a British Pedophile had ...
  • The law shouldn’t rely on good behavior from Billionaires Gawker is the internet’s most slimy news organization, a online website that has no qualms disclosing people’s sexual infidelities regardless of the cost such disclosures have on their personal lives. So for most people, seeing WWF superstar Hulk Hogan win a lawsuit against Gawker to the tune of $140 Million dollars was a real sight for sore eyes. But when ...
  • Passcodes should be protected Some people are fans of medieval torture, and who can blame them. There’s just something about the sadistic treatment of people that makes us both want to watch with a bowl of popcorn in our hands, yet at the same time turn away in disgust and discomfort. How else do you explain the popularity of shows like Saw? I ...
  • Making the world safe for Technology On April 2nd, 1917, the President of the United States of America addressed an extraordinary session in congress, asking them to authorize America to declare war against the central powers in World War 1. Across the Atlantic, the European continent had been devastated by nearly 3 years of bloody conflict. Regardless of who started the war, President ...
  • Full Disk Encryption with the keys inside Nobody really knows how the FBI is hacking into iPhones. Well nobody, except Cellebrite and the FBI themselves. We can safely assume that the underlying crypto wasn’t hacked–that would be truly catastrophic for everyone’s security, and way above the pay grade of a company like Cellebrite. So we have to conclude that somehow the FBI has managed to trick ...
  • When bad advice comes from good people What happens when a government agency tasked with providing cybersecurity “guidance” and “expertise” gives you advice like “avoid uploading pictures of yourself to avoid the threat of black magic”? And then goes into damage-control claiming that it “was just a casual remark and did not represent the federal agency’s official position on the matter”,  only to follow-up with ...
  • Security vs. Liberty : Sometimes it’s security and liberty A public service announcement from our good friends at the FBI, warns that motor vehicles are increasingly vulnerable to remote exploits, which in the wake of the bad-ass research from Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller shouldn’t be shocking. What struck me, is that the security advice the FBI is offering drivers was identical to the advice cybersecurity experts have been ...
  • FBI vs. Apple : Everything you need to know part 2 The Apple vs. FBI story has evolved so much in the past weeks, I thought I needed to write a separate post just on the updates. Admittedly, the story is far more complex and nuanced that I initially presumed, and everyone wants to be part of the conversation. On one side, we have the silicon valley tech ...
  • The miners dilemma – Bitcoin sabotage can be profitable Imagine a small village of a 100 people. One day,  a sorcerer shows up,  and grants all the villagers magical 1000-sided dice, which are purely random and can only be thrown at a fixed rate of 1 throw per second (no faster & no slower). Over the next year, at noon of every day, the sorcerer will announce a random number ...
  • Apple vs. FBI: Everything you need to know A judge in the US has ordered Apple to provide ‘technical assistance’ to FBI, in creating what some (but not all) cybersecurity experts call a backdoor. In the few years I’ve written about these issues, I’ve never seen anything as hotly debated as this one, across the folks from digital security to foreign policy all coming down ...
  • Keith’s on BFM Talking about spyware–again!! Today, I was on BFM talking about Hacking Team, the audio for which is below, and more comments and thoughts below that. Your browser does not support native audio, but you can download this MP3 to listen on your device.    This is my last ditch attempt to get a conversation started about the use of surveillance software by ...
  • Forcing journalist to reveal sources will be bad–for the government! Our spanking new, hand-picked Attorney-General is proposing life imprisonment for journalist who refuse to reveal their sources. And surprisingly, my favorite Member of Parliament,Dato Azalina Othman, has supported the move, saying it was ‘high-time’ Malaysian did something. Fortunately, some calmer more rationale heads, like Dato Paul Low have criticized the A-G for his short-sighted stupidity. Putting aside ...
  • Being Terrified: The price of terrorism Next week, I’ll be on BFM for an interview about spyware, which will be my last Hail Mary play to get a conversation started about the use of surveillance software by the Government. If a radio interview on a popular station won’t do it, nothing on my blog will possibly be able to anyway 🙂 In ...
  • Questions we need to ask about spyware If you believe (as I do), that the government bought spyware, then here are some pertinent questions Question 1: Do these government agencies actually have investigative powers? While the police might have the legal authority to investigate someone, does the PMO, MACC or anyone else share that authority. If a government agency has no right to investigate ...
  • PMO purchases of Hacking Team software The Prime Ministers Department has denied (twice!) that it has ever procured surveillance software from Hacking Team. Even though hundreds of e-mails in the leaked Hacking Team archive point to it. The latest rebuttal, Datuk Azalina distanced her Ministry from other government agencies, encouraging reporters to seek official statement directly from other agencies accused of ...
  • The Government doesn’t buy spyware–yea right! The Government has denied buying spyware from hacking team, they really should have checked with me before issuing the statement. On the 23rd of November 2015, Datuk Seri Azalina Othman Said denied that the Malaysian government had procured spyware from hacking team. In a formal response (in Parliament!!), the Minister simply stated “For your information, no such ...
  • The PM’s year end cyber-security message From: [email protected] Sent: 23 Dec 2015 To: [email protected] Subject: Cybersecurity Year end message. *This message is intended for all Malaysian Government servants only, do not forward without prior approval* Greetings and Salam 1Malaysia. I want to use this year-end as an opportunity to discuss the important topic of Cybersecurity. This year was interesting for me personally, and for all Malaysians, and we need ...
  • Hackers and terrorist There is no greater danger of tech illiteracy, than the way we treat hackers. A society that doesn’t understand technology will view those who can manipulate it as wizards and sorcerers. Technology sufficiently advanced is indistinguishable from magic, and to most people that bar of being ‘sufficiently advanced’ isn’t set very high. The magic analogy is apt, ...
  • Chip And Pin : An intro for Malaysians In 2016, Chip and Pin will gradually be introduced in Malaysia, that means your Credit Cards now will prompt you for a PIN instead of signature during purchases. This will be a bit of a hassle, but it will be worth it,  here’s what you need to know about it and credit card transactions in ...
  • The problem with bio-metrics Passwords have always been a problem. For a password to be adequately secure, you need a certain amount of randomness (or entropy in geek) associated with the password to ensure it can’t be easily guessed. The password monkey is less secure than the password k3ithI$one$3xydev1l, but the latter is inherently harder to remember (although still very true). Remember ...
  • Ransomware By now, you either know someone that’s been a victim of nasty malware or have yourself been on the business end of nefarious software. The perpetual duel between security companies and malicious elements in cyberspace has changed dramatically over time, and no change has been so dramatic as the rise of a new type of threat, ...
  • Hacking Government, Malaysian Style The simplest definition of a hacker, is someone who breaks systems. We tend to equate systems to computers, but that’s a limited definition of the term. A system can also refer to a legal system or a set of processes that have nothing to do with technology. For example, lawyers often hack around the law, looking ...
  • How corporations lie to the technologically challenged Two weeks ago, Lowyat.net published a ‘challenge’ to their readers, one that would supposedly pay a cool RM100,000 to the winner.All you had to do was decrypt an AES-256 encoded blob of code (more accurately referred to as ciphertext). As expected, no one won. Because breaking that ‘military-grade’ encryption is beyond the capability of most normal human ...
  • Why we fear ‘hackers’: Dangers of Technical Illiteracy Are you afraid of Hackers? Do you lie restless at night thinking of what might happen if they got into your bank account, facebook profile, or e-mail. Perhaps you’re also worried about that they might hack into a forum you visit, or that they might get into your personal messages on whatsapp. It’s true that hackers ...
  • Hacking Team got Hacked, and here’s what Malaysia Bought There are two types of governments in the world, Those that build complex surveillance software to spy on their citizens, and those that buy them–and our government is more the buying type. Few nation-states have the budgets to build out complex surveillance software, but some are finding that ‘off the shelf’ software sold by dodgy companies are just ...
  • The technological effects of SOSMA and POTA The new Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA) in Malaysia should not be considered in isolation but rather in the context of the 6 other anti-terrorism Bills that were concurrently proposed. All of these new laws, will almost certainly come into effect, thanks to the whip system employed by the ruling party. Yet the laws violate ...
  • FireEye: Group spied on Malaysia for 10 years The team over at the FireEye threat intelligence published a special report(pdf) detailing an long running (and still on-going) cyber-espionage operation that has targeted multiple entities in ASEAN countries, including Malaysia. The program was reported to be running for more than a decade, and the sustained period coupled with the list of targets the program had, led FireEye to ...
  • Worked Example: iPhone PIN Hack Last month, a company called MDSec released a video detailing how they manage to brute force hack an iPhone PIN lock. Pretty sweet piece of work, but I thought this would be a good example to understand how hacks work, and how hackers think. What is a hacker First off, we need to define what a hacker ...
  • The Snowden Revelations It’s now almost two years on, since that fateful day at the Mira Hotel in Hong Kong when Edward Snowden divulged secret NSA documents detailing unlawful and on-going spying programs carried out in the name of security. Sure we knew the government had ‘a’ spying program, and we’ve all seen Hollywood movies with fictional technology that allowed governments ...
  • Secure Apache configuration for WordPress & SSL Recently I moved the hosting for keithRozario.com from a regular hosted platform called WPWebhost to my own Virtual machine on digitalOcean. The results have been great, but the migration process was a bit tedious and took some effort. I thought I’d share my Apache configurations, so that if you’re thinking of hosting your own WordPress site on ...
  • Jho Low uses Gmail? Why emails can’t be considered evidence As the 1MDB fiasco begins to simmer over the political stove, I wanted to inject some technical information into this discussion, specifically around emails and how they’re almost useless pieces of evidence. Just to make sure everyone’s on the same page, here’s some context. In early March 2015, sarawakreport.org, a website run by investigative journalist Clare Rewcastle-Brown together ...
  • What happened in the MAS hack. All questions answered, one question asked. Late in January the Malaysian Airlines website was ‘supposedly’ hacked by Lizard Squad. You  might remember Lizard Squad as the guys who ‘hacked’ the XBox and Play Station network over the Christmas holidays, and I’m using a lot of ‘quotes’ here because Lizard Squad didn’t really ‘hack’ XBox One or Playstation, they merely DDOS-ed the ...
  • How to determine your Unifi router MAC ID  Step 1: Logon to your router To logon to your router, fire up your web-browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari–even Internet Explorer will do).  In the address bar where you usually type www.google.com type http://192.168.0.1 (sometimes it’s http://192.168.1.1 ) or just click the link. Once there enter the username and password of the router. If you’re uncertain try any one ...
  • Can Malaysia be Land of the Free and Home of the Brave As we come to terms with the terrible events that occurred at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, I think we need to be cognizant of  what these attacks really mean, and how our response to these events (even in far away Malaysia) has severe repercussions on our future. As a Blogger and Techie, I’m 100% for ...
  • Maxis Forum needs an upgrade Yesterday I Googled something about maxis that took me to a forum.maxis.com.my link. Unfortunately, Firefox wasn’t happy with Maxis, because I got the following screen: Firefox is the first of the mainstream browsers to end support of SSLv3, ever since Poodle was published. For those of you who aren’t keeping tabs of security issues–Poodle was a ...
  • Streamyx forced ads (202.71.99.194) A couple of days back, I was at my in-laws doing some browsing on their PC. Now my in-laws have a Windows XP laptop, that isn’t secured, which is fine because as far as I can tell, I’m the only one that uses it. Most of them now go to their phones or tablets for ...
  • Malaysian Government Hacked Environmental website? Environment News Service, an environmental focused news website this week accused Malaysian government hackers of attacking it after it ran a story implicating Sarawak governor Tun Abdul Taib Mahmud of corruption and graft. As a result, the site was down for 2-hours, before the site manage to re-gain control. “The attack on our site came from a Malaysian ...
  • ATM Hacks are so bloody boring Last week, while I was flying from KL to London, I noticed a strange anomaly on the screen of the boarding gate at KLIA. Closer inspection revealed that it was an anti-virus warning that signaled the computer had been infected by a Virus (almost 2 days ago!!). As a techie, I quickly deduced 3 things ...
  • A Techie’s view on the Law Are some laws worth following–in other words, are some Laws so idiotic that they should be ignored completely? That sounds anathema, because we have a romanticized definition of the law, we define the Law as a broad general agreement a society undertakes, and the law keeps society from tearing itself apart. In other words, the law is so sacred ...
  • Nearlyfreespeech the hosting provider that takes security seriously You all know how much I love nearlyfreespeech, it’s one of the best hosting providers out there. Here’s one more reason, recently they alerted me to a suspicious number of login attempts to my wordpress site, which usually means someone was trying to hack it. If you remember the post I did about the RHB bank ...
  • Who are you trusting online? When you get behind the wheel of your car, and hit the road–you’re implicitly trusting ever other road user to play by the rules.  You trust no one will go out of their way to crash into you, or that no one would swerve into you for an insurance claim, you even trust that pedestrians won’t ...
  • RHBNOW Email: Intricate details of a Phishing scam Last month alone I’ve received 6 phishing emails asking me to change my RHB banking password. I always wondered what would happen if I’d actually clicked on one of the links in the email–and today I did just that. Immediately I was transported to a dodgy world of sophisticated deception, and soon realized this was far more complicated that ...
  • Seatbelts and Anti-Virus software increase your risk There’s evidence to suggest that mandating seat-belts actually increases the accident rate in a country. The hypothesis is that drivers are  likely to take more risk in cars with visible security features like seat-belts than in cars without these safety features. Ironically feeling safe–is the most dangerous thing drivers are at risk from. In addition because car drivers ...
  • Malaysia boleh: 3 countries, 3 card-skimmers, all Malaysian On April 28th, 4 men were caught for installing card-skimming devices on ATM cash machines in Bangkok Thailand. They were all Malaysian. On the 14th of May, 6 men were caught for installing similar devices in ATM machines in Jakarta Indonesia. They were all Malaysian. On the 8th of June, 2 men were convicted in Singapore for ...
  • The right to be forgotten The truth is we all have something to hide–secrets we wished the world would never know. A political stance we once had, a video of ourselves after too many drinks, or even just a sentence we once uttered at a party somewhere. If you think you’ve got nothing to hide–you should think harder. So, when European Court ...
  • TrueCrypt is dead, long live ….bitlocker?!?!   The understatement of the month would be calling this a peculiar moment. This is far from peculiar–this is straightup WTF?! My favorite encryption software, TrueCrypt, has been abruptly and mysteriously shut-down(que dramatic music!!!). The official TrueCrypt website now only has some information on ‘alternatives’ and offers the following advice. WARNING: Using TrueCrypt is not secure as it ...
  • WTF is a bitcoin? WTF is a bitcoin? There’s much ado over the digital currency and many people struggle to understand what it is. In fact, even I haven’t fully grasped the fundamental nature of how it works–but then again I don’t know how the banking and fiat currency system work, yet I still use it. In essence, there’s been ...
  • Heartbleed explained in under 2 minutes Well maybe that’s an exaggeration, it’s actually 2 minutes and 1 second!
  • What kind of Porn do Malaysians watch Let’s be honest–Malaysians watch a lot of Porn. On the outside, we may espouse our ‘Asian’ values and culture, but the cold-hard data suggest we’re as horny as the Japanese. In one of my past post, I showed how we have evidence of someone using the Government internet connection to download porn. Today however, PornMD the self-proclaimed ...
  • How to prevent your Unifi account from being hacked OK….I made a boo boo! Actually my method of ‘hacking’ the Unifi modems has a ridiculously simple work-around. Unfortunately, when I published the findings I was absolutely convinced the workaround didn’t work–I was wrong 🙁 Details about how I was mis-lead are unimportant for now (although I will explain it later on), for now I think the ...
  • How I hacked 4 Unifi accounts in under 5 minutes So I was wondering if I should publish this, but I guess I have to. If you’re one of the 500,000 Unifi subscribers in Malaysia, you need to know that your stock router–is completely hackable. TM has left you literally hanging by your coat-tails with a router that can be hacked as easily as pasting ...
  • Of pirated software and vaccinations Here’s a quick question–do you have a ‘original’ version of Windows running on your PC or is it pirated? If you’re like me, then obviously you’ve learnt long ago to only use original versions of software–especially when it’s the operating system of your PC. Of course, I wasn’t always like this, back in my university days, ...
  • CCTV in toilets vs. Photos on facebook Wedding dinners in the Klang Valley, can only be called wedding dinners if they have at least 3 video presentations, one of photos of the couples on their ‘pre-wedding’ shoots, one for their ‘wedding-day’ shoots and of course the ever popular ‘story of our life’ montage–where the couple walk you through photos of their childhood ...
  • Best VPN for Malaysians : Privateinternetaccess As you’ve probably gauged from my recent bout of paranoia, I’m a bit of a security-freak. My PC at home, not only runs an original version of Windows (something rare in Malaysia), but also multiple anti-virus and anti-malware suites, not to mention using EMET for even more security and a software firewall to boot. So it ...
  • Asus N12 HP: The best Unifi replacement router? Update: 20-July-2014 Since writing this post, my 1-year old Asus router begun experiencing issues with its WiFi. My devices couldn’t connect via WiFi, although the wired-Ethernet connections were fine. I called up Asus and they confirmed that my router was still under warranty, however I tried sending it to the many service centers listed on their ...
  • Hack TM Unifi: In case you’ve lost your default password There’s a lot of documentation online on how to hack your neighbours Wi-Fi, but sometimes you need to hack your own system. Usually its because you’ve change your router password and forgot it completely, leaving you in the cold desolate place we like to call “No router land”. Don’t fear though, its actually pretty darn easy ...
  • The Security Offences Bill 2012 -Technology Perspective The Security Offences (Special Measures) Act 2012 and it’s new amendment. that wonderful piece of legislation meant to repeal the archaic and ‘draconian’ ISA may turn out to be even more archaic and draconian than the ISA it was meant to replace. While much of the legal fanfare has been focusing on the detention without trial sections of ...
  • How Computer Security Research works: Facebook 20,000 prize In the early days of public computing, researchers who discovered vulnerabilities would quietly tell the product vendors so as to not also alert hackers. But all too often, the vendors would ignore the researchers. Because the vulnerability was not public, there was no urgency to fix it. Fixes might go into the next product ...
  • .my domains hacked: Why SSL is more important than ever MyNic is the organization responsible for managing the .my Top Level Domain, which means every website address that ends with a .my is under their administration. These centralized control centers act as giant targets for hackers, but for the most part, they’re protected better than Fort Knox–or they should be. Yesterday, a hacker going by the ...
  • Should the government use Microsoft products?  I don’t think the US government should use operating systems made in China for the same reason that most governments shouldn’t use operating systems made in the US and in fact we just got proof since Microsoft is now known to be telling the NSA about bugs in Windows before it fixes them. -Richard Matthew ...
  • Part 3: PRISM and Upstream Initially I wrote about PRISM and how a lot of people felt it was a tool to intercept communication in flight to companies like Google and Facebook, however slightly more details have emerged to debunk that claim. However, it’s of paramount importance that we understand what people are saying. No one is denying that communications aren’t ...
  • PRISM and Tempora As Edward Snowden begins to look for more ‘accommodating’ countries who wouldn’t mind playing host to a man that currently is more wanted than Osama bin Laden, Saddam Hussein and Kim Kardashian combined, more details slowly begin to emerge about PRISM, painting an ever clearer picture of the extent of the program both Stateside and ...
  • How secure are the webpages of Malaysian Banks and Telco I’ve almost been fascinated by the fact, that our money in the bank these days are secured not by steel doors or armed guards, but rather by cryptography and the encryption keys that enable them. To put it in the simplest form  your money in the bank is protected by a number–that’s what an encryption ...
  • What is PRISM? There’s a controversy brewing in the land of the free, one that will have implications for Americans, but also Malaysians and nearly every citizen of the world. We may look back at the moment Mr. Snowden leaked controversial (and ugly) slides about a program called ‘PRISM’ as the start of a pivotal moment in internet ...
  • Security Offences Bill vs. Universal declaration of Human Rights This is what Article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights says: No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks. This is what security offences bill ...
  • Can you out-tech the government? Over the past years we’ve seen a recurrent theme where Government agencies were attempting to curtail internet freedom in the name of ‘keeping the peace’. From Saudi telcos threatening security experts to help them hijack tweets to governments procuring tools like Finspy to spy on their citizens–usually without any warrant or legal oversight. We’ve seen ...
  • Microsoft is eavesdropping on your skype conversations The guys over at H-online reported recently that they have some pretty good evidence that good ol’ Microsoft is eavesdropping onto your Skype conversations, and the results are pretty damning. The method for detecting those sneaky little eavesdroppers was pretty ingenious though. The researchers sent two urls in their skype messages to each other. The urls ...
  • What is Finfisher capable of Heard about the latest allegation accusing the Malaysian BN government of using Finfisher on its own Citizens? Well that allegation is true–to me at least, and here’s a taste of what Finfisher can do in the hands of the government.
  • Telekom Malaysia is censoring the internet prior to GE13 I’m not a usual fearmonger, or a person who panics easily–yet you friendly local tech evangelist has a warning for Malaysian users out there. Unifi is censoring the internet in the run up to the hotly contested GE1–and that’s what the data suggest. You heard that right folks, some of you suspected all along, and I ...
  • Malaysian Cyberwar: Is it an external war or is it civil A really piece written by Asohan Aryaduray on DigitalNewsAsia some time back talked about how the CyberWar between Malaysia and the Philippines was going on, and how he wanted government agencies to step up the security of our digital assets (or at least start the discussion). Asohan claims that Malaysia perhaps has “the most number of government ...
  • Malaysian government using spyware against citizens? No, not really. I’ve been pretty busy the past few months, and my post count has been pretty low, and although I just returned from a 2 week trip abroad and am now flushed full of work, I decided to burn a bit of the midnight oil today because the Malaysian Insider completely pissed me off. It all started ...
  • Evidence Act: Anonymity before the internet I read a brilliant article on the Evidence act by Zul Rafique and Partners that I think everyone should read. In it, the author compares the newly amended Evidence Act (supposedly amended to combat the evils of the internet) to a sub-section of the original act meant to look into telegraphs. Now I must admit, ...
  • Evidence Act Technological Misconceptions: A response to Rocky and Fatimah The government has finally ‘relented’ and now wants to ‘discuss’ section 114A of the Evidence act 1950. Now it’s great because it proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that: 1. The internet can be used for fantastic good. 2. The general Malaysian public can make a difference in the governance of the country. My website also had ...
  • Internet Privacy with TOR: Should the internet be anonymous It’s an irony that while the internet was the first place you could create avatars and split personalities to impersonate others, it has now turned into a free for all buffet for private data. I previously shared on how the ads you see on facebook were inherently tied to the Google searches you perform, and ...
  • Scary Scary Privacy Concerns Online Would you get freaked out if I told that from just 1 hour of internet browsing, your information could be shared with nearly 70 organizations, including advertisers who use it to target ads to you. Would you be angered if this information were sold to other 3rd parties including insurance providers and even governments to ...
  • How come the ads you see look like your previous searches? Ever wonder how come the ads you see on Facebook or Malaysiakini reflect the searches you just recently made. Ever felt freaked out about it, there really is nothing to freak out about, unless of course you’re worried that a Multi-Billion dollar company may be keeping information about your searches and sharing them with ad ...
  • Google Trust Issue I remember graduating from university and heading over to Intel for my first job interview. I can’t remember most of the interview (and maybe that’s why I never got the job), but I do remember telling the interviewer my dream was to work for Google, in hindsight I probably shouldn’t have said that. Even then, and ...
  • First xxx domain hijacked : Popebenedict.xxx The first (of probably many) xxx domain hijacks have started springing up. Earlier today, a reader contacted me about a recent post I did on the .xxx domains. He mentioned that he spotted popebenedict.xxx in the wild and was curious if this was the first .xxx domain hijack. He maybe right, but in a post ...
  • YTL has the most ridiculous Acceptable Use Policy YTL Communications has been doing a pretty good job recently. The Star even went as far as claim that “YTL Comms to Break Even” until of course you read the article in which case it mentions that YTL require an additional 500,000 subscribers on top of it’s current 300,000 to achieve that.  However, it did ...
  • Good Design: Google reminds you that you recently changed your password A couple of weeks back, Dreamhost reported a security breach on it’s servers, so I thought for security sake I should change my passwords as well. I’d been using the same password for the past couple of years and it was time for a change anyway. However, as most of you will notice,  whenever you’ve just ...
  • WordPress 3.3.1: security vulnerability fix, Thanks to Go Daddy? Wordpress 3.3.1 was released today. This latest version of wordpress comes fresh of the heels of the 3.3 release and fixes 15 issues including a security vulnerability fix which Wordpress doesn’t fully disclose. Wordpress admins should see the prompt to update their blogs, and a update can be done fairly quickly via the automated update from ...

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